The Six Cubit Man

As tall as the trees but as small as the sands

neyagawa:

foxnewsofficial:

you could really fuck with your baby if you get something embarrassing tattooed on the top of their head when they’re born and don’t tell them then they go bald 50 years later like what the fuck

never become a parent

(via bettycrockercorp)

krocatoo:

Having to google internet slang your friend is using because you have no idea what the fuck it means.

image

(via sporkandyogurt)

inspiringdresses:



Beginning in the late 19th century, Asian decorative arts, and those of Japan in particular, had a tremendous impact on Western culture. Many Americans and Europeans traveled to Japan, often returning with textiles and garments that were soon converted to familiar Western garments. This blue dressing gown began as a Japanese furisode, or “swinging sleeves” kimono, a type worn only by young unmarried women. It is a particularly creative example of how Japanese dress could be transformed into fashionable Western dress. Through the addition of princess seams, lace undersleeves and inserts of pale-blue taffeta at front and back, the furisode kimono became a stylish Western dressing gown, complete with bustle. Regardless of these Western elements, the dressing gown is strongly evocative of Japan, particularly in its retention of the crimson lining often found in women’s kimonos.

inspiringdresses:

imageimage

Beginning in the late 19th century, Asian decorative arts, and those of Japan in particular, had a tremendous impact on Western culture. Many Americans and Europeans traveled to Japan, often returning with textiles and garments that were soon converted to familiar Western garments. This blue dressing gown began as a Japanese furisode, or “swinging sleeves” kimono, a type worn only by young unmarried women. It is a particularly creative example of how Japanese dress could be transformed into fashionable Western dress. Through the addition of princess seams, lace undersleeves and inserts of pale-blue taffeta at front and back, the furisode kimono became a stylish Western dressing gown, complete with bustle. Regardless of these Western elements, the dressing gown is strongly evocative of Japan, particularly in its retention of the crimson lining often found in women’s kimonos.

(via teddy529)